Chronic Kidney Disease

Your kidneys normally filter your blood to remove waste products and extra fluid. With chronic kidney disease, the kidneys have not been working right, causing wastes to build up in your blood and make you sick.

Chronic kidney disease is also called chronic renal failure or chronic renal insufficiency.

How Chronic Kidney Disease is Diagnosed

Blood and urine tests can show signs of kidney disease and anemia, which can result from kidney damage. Chronic kidney disease is diagnosed by measuring how well your kidneys are working using a glomerular filtration rate (GFR). A blood test shows your blood creatinine levels, which are then used to calculate your GFR. Sometimes an ultrasound or CT scan is also required. There are five stages of kidney disease, from kidney damage with normal GFR to kidney failure.


What Causes Chronic Kidney Disease?

Most commonly, chronic kidney disease is caused by uncontrolled high blood pressure or high blood sugar from uncontrolled type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Other diseases and infections (like polycystic kidney disease, pyelonephritis and glomerulonephritis) can also cause chronic kidney disease. Sometimes congenital kidney problems or damaged renal arteries can also cause chronic kidney disease.

Some medications can also damage the kidneys when used long-term, including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as celecoxib and ibuprofen.


What are the symptoms?

Symptoms of chronic kidney disease can be silent for many years. As kidney function worsens, symptoms become more noticeable. You may realize you are urinating less, feeling fatigued and losing your appetite. Sometimes people notice swelling from fluid that builds up in our tissues. You might also feel nauseous, have headaches and have difficulty sleeping.


Treatments

Medications and lifestyle changes can help to slow or stop kidney damage from chronic kidney disease. When an underlying condition like high blood pressure or diabetes is causing kidney damage, it’s important to treat those conditions first. Losing weight and exercising more can help. You may need a diet that’s lower in sodium, and to watch how much fluid you drink. You should also not drink alcohol or smoke if you have chronic kidney disease.

Patients with advanced stage kidney disease may require a kidney transplant or dialysis treatments.


View Resources & Tools 


Meet our Chronic Kidney Disease Specialists:

Showing 1 - 10 of 45


Name Specialties Location
Bacay, Angelito Cura, MD
860.872.8563
  • Nephrology
  • Vernon
  • Willimantic
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Benson, Scott Marshall, DO
860.522.2377
  • Nephrology
  • Internal Medicine
Show Less
  • Hartford
  • Bloomfield
  • Hartford
Show Less
Blanco, Marta Delosange, MD
860.344.8606
  • Nephrology
  • Middletown
  • Essex
  • Meriden
  • Meriden
  • Middletown
Show Less
Borrelli, Patricia N., APRN
203.799.1252
  • Nephrology
  • Orange
Carley, Matthew Donald, MD
860.241.0700
  • Nephrology
  • Internal Medicine
Show Less
  • Hartford
  • Avon
Show Less
Chafouleas, Eleas J., MD
860.872.8563
  • Nephrology
  • Vernon
  • Willimantic
Show Less
Chuang, Peter Yenlung, MD
203.799.1252
  • Nephrology
  • Orange
Chughtai, Irfan Saeed, MD
203.237.6700
  • Nephrology
  • Meriden
  • Wallingford
Show Less
Curley, Timothy Michael, DO
860.241.0700
  • Nephrology
  • Internal Medicine
Show Less
  • Hartford
  • Bloomfield
  • Farmington
  • Wethersfield
Show Less
DeCruz, Suzzunne Nicole, PA-C
203.799.1252
  • Nephrology
  • Orange

Showing 1 - 10 of 45

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