Tourette Syndrome

Tourette syndrome is a brain condition that starts in childhood.

Individuals with Tourette syndrome make sounds and movements that they can’t easily control –called tics. Tics tend to peak at age 12 and decrease during the teenage years. Sometimes tics go away by adulthood.


Symptoms

Those with Tourette syndrome have different patterns of tics. The tics may not be obvious, or can be bursts of sounds or movement that last for seconds or minutes.

Tics can include:

  • Eye blinking and eye-rolling
  • Jerking of the neck
  • Coughing or throat-clearing
  • A mix of movement and sounds

It is common for someone with Tourette syndrome to feel an urge in some part of the body that can only be relieved by performing the tic. Not everyone with Tourette syndrome is aware of these urges.

The patterns of tics can change as time goes on. They may get worse and then get better or a new tic may develop or an old one may come back. Tics may get worse when ill, under stress or excited.

Despite what you may have seen in movies or on TV, most people with Tourette syndrome do not have uncontrollable outbursts of cursing or sexual behavior.


Screening & Diagnosing Tourette Syndrome

The exact cause of Tourette syndrome is unknown but it tends to run in families. It is more common in boys than in girls.

A doctor can diagnose Tourette syndrome based on your medical history and symptoms. There are no tests to confirm the diagnose but in some cases, an electroencephalogram (EEG), an MRI brain scan, or blood tests may be done to check for other health problems. Your doctor may check for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) or other learning or behavior problems as these can sometimes occur with Tourette syndrome.


Treating Tourette Syndrome

Treatment for Tourette syndrome involves learning to cope with the tics. Understanding how the tics affect you can help you know what to expect. It can be helpful to identify when tics occur to avoid things that cause them.

Some individuals do not need treatment, but if the tics are interfering with your quality of life or work and school, then counseling and behavioral therapy to reduce tics and medicine may help.



Meet our Tourette Syndrome Specialists:

Elena Bortan

4.90000009536743

Neurology

Medical Group Chase Family Movement Disorders Center
Mystic, CT 06355
Michelle Dagostine

4.90000009536743

Neurology

Medical Group Chase Family Movement Disorders Center
Cheshire, CT 06410
Joy Antonelle de Marcaida

4.90000009536743

Neurology

Medical Group Chase Family Movement Disorders Center
Vernon, CT 06066
Benjamin Dorfman

 

Neurology

Medical Group Chase Family Movement Disorders Center at Charlotte Hungerford Hospital
Torrington, CT 06790
Jeffrey Lahrmann

4.69999980926514

Neurology

Medical Group Chase Family Movement Disorders Center
Vernon, CT 06066
Jessica Lawton

4.90000009536743

Neurology

Medical Group Chase Family Movement Disorders Center
Mystic, CT 06355
Duarte Machado

4.90000009536743

Neurology

Medical Group Chase Family Movement Disorders Center
Cheshire, CT 06410
Maria Moro De Casillas

4.90000009536743

Neurology

Medical Group Chase Family Movement Disorders Center
Mystic, CT 06355
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